Myend Directives: A quick walkthrough

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The new and improved desktop version of Myend comes with a bunch of new features and some upgraded older ones. A crucial change our older users are going to notice are the extended directives that are now available. 

Let’s go through them quickly so you have a better overview of our new and exciting services!

E-will

An existing but classic Myend feature. This directive lets you create a low-maintenance and completely free of charge e-will. An e-will refers, of course, to a non-legally binding set of instructions for your loved ones after you pass away. Entries from your Vault, Belongings and Last Goodbyes are listed here per beneficiary.

Read more about the difference between an e-will and a Last Will here.

Last Will & Testament

The new desktop version of Myend comes with our own, easy to use and elaborate Last Will and Testament. Our US users are going to be happy to hear that this is a legally binding document. It is tailored to satisfy probate court requirements as described in Federal and State Law. The Last Will includes many exciting features such as Trust and guardianship articles for your kids and many backup options. This way we aim to give an easy-to use Will, with the maximum freedom of choice and customization. 

You can read more in detail about Myend’s Last Will here.

Funeral Plan

This plan is an excellent way for you to communicate your wishes to your loved ones regarding your funeral. Moreover, you can add notes about an extensive variety of occasions such as your wake, presence of religious elements and other further wishes.

Organ Donation

This feature is perfect for someone who is a registered organ donor and wants to have yet another piece of documentation about it. If you are not a registered donor you can still use this directive to make your wishes known.

Advanced Care Plan

In this extensive directive you can set up a care plan that suits all your medical needs – and preferences. Fill in your medical history, appoint trusted people as your decision makers or even discuss medical help and dying. You can combine this plan with other documents you may have in effect such as a medical Power of Attorney or any other document that names a healthcare proxy.

Euthanasia Statement

In most cases and countries, euthanasia is not legal. However, there are versions of it that are more in a gray area. Even if there is no legal context for euthanasia in your country it is still worth it to making your wishes known. Then at least your relatives and close family doctors are aware of what you would ideally like to get. You can even specify which conditions of living should be seen as not sustainable or with inadequate quality of life.

Why should you fill in the optional directives?

Your Last Will (including a Trust) is the only directive that has legal effect as an Estate Plan. Maybe you think that you should skip the rest of the plans then. We discuss next why you shouldn’t though.

In short, because providing a concrete plan to your loved ones can have great benefits to them. Emotionally, mentally and even financially. And that applies to all optional directives mentioned above.

Final Thoughts

It is useful to keep in mind that you can fill in any combinations of all these directives. We recommend that you complete all of them so that you are as consistent and thorough as possible. However, some of them may not interest you, or simply you don’t have the time. Not too worry, you are absolutely free to fill in everything in an independent manner. This means that not using a directive, doesn’t take away from the legitimacy of your other documents. 

And with your Myend account we can revisit all these documents later if you change your mind or you want to update them.